top of page
Search
  • Writer's pictureHossein Elgafy

Spinal Gout

Updated: Apr 18, 2020



World J Orthop. 2016 Nov 18;7(11):766-775. Spinal Gout: A Review With Case Illustration Hossein ElgafyXiaochen LiuJoseph Herron

Abstract Aim: To summarize clinical presentations and treatment options of spinal gout in the literature from 2000 to 2014, and present theories for possible mechanism of spinal gout formation. Methods: The authors reviewed 68 published cases of spinal gout, which were collected by searching "spinal gout" on PubMed from 2000 to 2014. The data were analyzed for clinical features, anatomical location of spinal gout, laboratory studies, imaging studies, and treatment choices. Results: Of the 68 patients reviewed, the most common clinical presentation was back or neck pain in 69.1% of patients. The most common lab

oratory study was elevated uric acid levels in 66.2% of patients. The most common diagnostic image finding was hypointense lesion of the gout tophi on the T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan. The most common surgical treatment performed was a laminectomy in 51.5% and non-surgical treatment was performed in 29.4% of patients. Conclusion: Spinal gout most commonly present as back or neck pain with majority of reported patients with elevated uric acid. The diagnosis of spinal gout is confirmed with the presence of negatively birefringent monosodium urate crystals in tissue. Treatment for spinal gout involves medication for the reduction of uric acid level and surgery if patient symptoms failed to respond to medical treatment.

10 views0 comments

Comentarios


bottom of page